MCS Environmental

The Toxic Effects Of Fungal Exposure

 

Once one is tested and diagnosed with mycotoxicosis, one should begin to try to assess the extent of the fungal infection and how impaired, if any, one may be.  This is exceptionally important as most physicians are inexperienced in dealing with this illness, and finding out as much as one can would possibly most helpful in describing symptoms and effective treatments. 

Fungi have long been known to affect human well being in various ways, including disease of essential crop plants, decay of stored foods with possible concomitant production of mycotoxins, superficial and systemic infection of human tissues, and disease associated with immune stimulation such as hypersensitivity pneumonitis and toxic pneumonitis.  The spores of a large number of important fungi are less than 5 Ám aerodynamic diameter, and therefore are able to enter the lungs. They also may contain significant amounts of mycotoxins.  Diseases associated with inhalation of fungal spores can include toxic pneumonitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, tremors, chronic fatigue syndrome, kidney failure, and cancer.

Exposure to molds has become a significant health risk to an increasing number of workers in various occupations throughout the nations. Fungal antigens are able to cause occupational asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and organic dust toxic syndrome(ODTS).   In recent years, an increasing incidence of mold-induced diseases has been encountered in moldy contaminated water-damaged buildings. This has occurred both in homes and workplaces. Symptomatic persons occupying moisture problem buildings may develop asthma, rhinitis, ODTS and HP.